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Iowa Man Sentenced to 40 Months in Prison for Identity Theft, Social Security Number Misuse

February 13, 2018

Office Affiliation: The Office of Investigations

From the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Northern District of Iowa:

A man who has been wanted by the Army since the early 1980s was sentenced today to more than 3 years in federal prison.

Daryl Grigsby, age 57, most recently from Dyersville, Iowa, received the prison term after a September 6, 2017, guilty plea to one count of aggravated identity theft and one count of misuse of a Social Security Number.

Information from the sentencing hearing showed that Grigsby was convicted at court-martial of aggravated assault while serving in the Army in the 1980s.  Following his conviction and while pending additional criminal charges, Grigsby ran from the Army.  He was later convicted of bank robbery in federal court Oregon in the 1990s while using the name “Aaron Davis.”  In 2001, Grigsby absconded from federal supervised release.  At some point after his bank robbery conviction, Grigsby began using the identity and Social Security Number of another person.  He continued to use that identity until his arrest in Iowa last year.  Grigsby is still wanted by the Army.  He was on the Army’s most wanted list until his arrest in Iowa.   

Grigsby was sentenced in Cedar Rapids by United States District Court Judge Linda R. Reade.  Grigsby was sentenced to 40 months’ imprisonment.  A special assessment of $200 was imposed and he was ordered to make $19,401 in restitution to the Social Security Administration and $46,118.48 in restitution to the State of Iowa.  He must also serve a 3-year term of supervised release after the prison term.  There is no parole in the federal system.

Grigsby is being held in the United States Marshal’s custody until he can be transported to a federal prison.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Anthony Morfitt and investigated by the Social Security Administration – Office of the Inspector General. 

A man who has been wanted by the Army since the early 1980s was sentenced today to more than 3 years in federal prison.

Daryl Grigsby, age 57, most recently from Dyersville, Iowa, received the prison term after a September 6, 2017, guilty plea to one count of aggravated identity theft and one count of misuse of a Social Security Number.

Information from the sentencing hearing showed that Grigsby was convicted at court-martial of aggravated assault while serving in the Army in the 1980s.  Following his conviction and while pending additional criminal charges, Grigsby ran from the Army.  He was later convicted of bank robbery in federal court Oregon in the 1990s while using the name “Aaron Davis.”  In 2001, Grigsby absconded from federal supervised release.  At some point after his bank robbery conviction, Grigsby began using the identity and Social Security Number of another person.  He continued to use that identity until his arrest in Iowa last year.  Grigsby is still wanted by the Army.  He was on the Army’s most wanted list until his arrest in Iowa.   

Grigsby was sentenced in Cedar Rapids by United States District Court Judge Linda R. Reade.  Grigsby was sentenced to 40 months’ imprisonment.  A special assessment of $200 was imposed and he was ordered to make $19,401 in restitution to the Social Security Administration and $46,118.48 in restitution to the State of Iowa.  He must also serve a 3-year term of supervised release after the prison term.  There is no parole in the federal system.

Grigsby is being held in the United States Marshal’s custody until he can be transported to a federal prison.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Anthony Morfitt and investigated by the Social Security Administration – Office of the Inspector General. 

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