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Kentucky Man Pleads Guilty to Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid Fraud

March 23, 2016

Office Affiliation: The Office of Investigations

From the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Western District of Kentucky:

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. – A Cave City, Kentucky, man pleaded guilty in United States District Court today, before District Judge Greg N. Stivers, to defrauding the Social Security Administration because he failed to report income and falsely misrepresented his mental condition in order to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits, announced U.S. Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.

In court, Gary Hank Thompson, 33, admitted that between August 2009 and April 2013, he made misrepresentations in order to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits from the Social Security Administration in the amount of $24,884, to which he was not entitled. Supplemental Security Income is a federal government program that provides benefits to individuals who are disabled and have limited income and resources.

In his initial application for Supplemental Security Income, Thompson also applied for Medicaid, and during the same period, obtained $81,831 in Medicaid benefits.

At various points, including during the initial field interview with Social Security Administration personnel in August 2009, and during the April 15, 2013, redetermination meeting with Social Security Administration personnel in Warren County, Kentucky, defendant Thompson falsely represented his mental condition by slowing his speech and stuttering, and generally saying and doing things to make it seem that he had issues with comprehension, when he did not. The defendant misrepresented his mental condition in this way to qualify for benefits and to continue qualifying for Supplemental Security Income benefits. Thompson’s misrepresentations of his mental condition were material to whether he would receive Supplemental Security Income benefits, as he initially qualified under “organic mental disorders.” When the Social Security Administration was provided with accurate information concerning the defendant’s mental condition, it reevaluated whether he qualified for Supplemental Security Income and determined he did not.

Additionally, the defendant made material omissions and misstatements regarding his income and resources, which affected his eligibility for Supplemental Security Income benefits. Between August 2009 and April 2013, the defendant made multiple statements to the Social Security Administration that he had no gifts, income, or resources. This was not in fact true, as the defendant later admitted he failed to report amounts of up to $40 a day that he made panhandling, which would have affected his eligibility for Supplemental Security Income benefits.

At sentencing, before Judge Stivers, on June 28, 2016, in Bowling Green, the United States will recommend a 27-month sentence and an order for Thompson to pay restitution of $24,884 to the Social Security Administration and $81,831 to the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Amanda E. Gregory and was investigated by the Office of the Inspector General of the Social Security Administration.

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. – A Cave City, Kentucky, man pleaded guilty in United States District Court today, before District Judge Greg N. Stivers, to defrauding the Social Security Administration because he failed to report income and falsely misrepresented his mental condition in order to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits, announced U.S. Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.

In court, Gary Hank Thompson, 33, admitted that between August 2009 and April 2013, he made misrepresentations in order to receive Supplemental Security Income benefits from the Social Security Administration in the amount of $24,884, to which he was not entitled. Supplemental Security Income is a federal government program that provides benefits to individuals who are disabled and have limited income and resources.

In his initial application for Supplemental Security Income, Thompson also applied for Medicaid, and during the same period, obtained $81,831 in Medicaid benefits.

At various points, including during the initial field interview with Social Security Administration personnel in August 2009, and during the April 15, 2013, redetermination meeting with Social Security Administration personnel in Warren County, Kentucky, defendant Thompson falsely represented his mental condition by slowing his speech and stuttering, and generally saying and doing things to make it seem that he had issues with comprehension, when he did not. The defendant misrepresented his mental condition in this way to qualify for benefits and to continue qualifying for Supplemental Security Income benefits. Thompson’s misrepresentations of his mental condition were material to whether he would receive Supplemental Security Income benefits, as he initially qualified under “organic mental disorders.” When the Social Security Administration was provided with accurate information concerning the defendant’s mental condition, it reevaluated whether he qualified for Supplemental Security Income and determined he did not.

Additionally, the defendant made material omissions and misstatements regarding his income and resources, which affected his eligibility for Supplemental Security Income benefits. Between August 2009 and April 2013, the defendant made multiple statements to the Social Security Administration that he had no gifts, income, or resources. This was not in fact true, as the defendant later admitted he failed to report amounts of up to $40 a day that he made panhandling, which would have affected his eligibility for Supplemental Security Income benefits.

At sentencing, before Judge Stivers, on June 28, 2016, in Bowling Green, the United States will recommend a 27-month sentence and an order for Thompson to pay restitution of $24,884 to the Social Security Administration and $81,831 to the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Amanda E. Gregory and was investigated by the Office of the Inspector General of the Social Security Administration.

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