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Maryland Woman Sentenced to 18 Months in Prison for Deceased Payee Fraud

November 13, 2015

Office Affiliation: The Office of Investigations

From the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Maryland:

Greenbelt, Maryland – U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow sentenced Theresa Darlene Snead, age 56, of Suitland, Maryland today to 18 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for theft of government property in connection with a scheme to steal over $115,000 in Social Security benefits. Judge Chasanow also entered an order requiring Snead to pay restitution of $115,388.

The sentence was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein and Special Agent in Charge Michael McGill of the Social Security Administration - Office of Inspector General, Philadelphia Field Division.

According to Snead’s plea agreement, between May 1986 and her death on January 10, 2003, Individual A received monthly retirement benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA).  At the time of her death, Individual A was living with Snead.  Individual A’s death was not reported to SSA.  Between January 2003 and March 2014, when the benefits were terminated, SSA continued to mail Individual A’s monthly benefits check to Snead’s address in Suitland.

Snead admitted that after Individual A’s death she cashed the SSA checks at a local liquor store, using an identification card bearing Individual A’s name, but Snead’s photograph.  Snead signed the back of each check in Individual A’s name. SSA paid a total of $115,388 in retirement benefits after Individual A’s death.  Snead admitted that she knew she was not entitled to these benefits.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein commended the SSA Office of Inspector General for its work in the investigation.  Mr. Rosenstein thanked Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Lauren Perry and Assistant U. S. Attorney Lindsay Eyler Kaplan, who prosecuted the case.

Greenbelt, Maryland – U.S. District Judge Deborah K. Chasanow sentenced Theresa Darlene Snead, age 56, of Suitland, Maryland today to 18 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for theft of government property in connection with a scheme to steal over $115,000 in Social Security benefits. Judge Chasanow also entered an order requiring Snead to pay restitution of $115,388.

The sentence was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein and Special Agent in Charge Michael McGill of the Social Security Administration - Office of Inspector General, Philadelphia Field Division.

According to Snead’s plea agreement, between May 1986 and her death on January 10, 2003, Individual A received monthly retirement benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA).  At the time of her death, Individual A was living with Snead.  Individual A’s death was not reported to SSA.  Between January 2003 and March 2014, when the benefits were terminated, SSA continued to mail Individual A’s monthly benefits check to Snead’s address in Suitland.

Snead admitted that after Individual A’s death she cashed the SSA checks at a local liquor store, using an identification card bearing Individual A’s name, but Snead’s photograph.  Snead signed the back of each check in Individual A’s name. SSA paid a total of $115,388 in retirement benefits after Individual A’s death.  Snead admitted that she knew she was not entitled to these benefits.

United States Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein commended the SSA Office of Inspector General for its work in the investigation.  Mr. Rosenstein thanked Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Lauren Perry and Assistant U. S. Attorney Lindsay Eyler Kaplan, who prosecuted the case.

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