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Maine Woman Pleads Guilty to Stealing Supplemental Security Income

February 10, 2014

Office Affiliation: The Office of Investigations

From the U.S. Attorney’s Office, District of Maine:

Bangor, Maine: United States Attorney Thomas E. Delahanty II announced that Laura Mathieu, 50, of Oakland, Maine, pled guilty to stealing more than $1,000 in Supplemental Security Income (“SSI”) benefits from the Social Security Administration (“SSA”). SSI benefits are paid to, among others, people who are disabled and have low income and few resources.

According to court records, Mathieu submitted a false statement to SSA that was used for determining her eligibility for SSI benefits. Mathieu falsely stated her household was limited to herself and her children and she denied receiving any other help or financial assistance. In fact, she was living with her husband who was providing financial assistance. Mathieu knew that she had to truthfully disclose her living arrangements and the income earned by any member of her household. She confessed to investigators that she concealed that information because she believed that the information would disqualify her from receiving SSI benefits.

Mathieu faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, or both. She will be sentenced after completion of a pre-sentence report by the United States Probation Office.

The investigation was conducted by the Office of Inspector General of the Social Security Administration.

Bangor, Maine: United States Attorney Thomas E. Delahanty II announced that Laura Mathieu, 50, of Oakland, Maine, pled guilty to stealing more than $1,000 in Supplemental Security Income (“SSI”) benefits from the Social Security Administration (“SSA”). SSI benefits are paid to, among others, people who are disabled and have low income and few resources.

According to court records, Mathieu submitted a false statement to SSA that was used for determining her eligibility for SSI benefits. Mathieu falsely stated her household was limited to herself and her children and she denied receiving any other help or financial assistance. In fact, she was living with her husband who was providing financial assistance. Mathieu knew that she had to truthfully disclose her living arrangements and the income earned by any member of her household. She confessed to investigators that she concealed that information because she believed that the information would disqualify her from receiving SSI benefits.

Mathieu faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, or both. She will be sentenced after completion of a pre-sentence report by the United States Probation Office.

The investigation was conducted by the Office of Inspector General of the Social Security Administration.

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